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Old 21st December 2017
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Red face Apple admits they deliberately slow down old iPhones

The tech giant has confirmed that updates in iOS intentionally reduce speed in older phones in order to preserve the life of batteries as they degrade.



Reddit users have noticed that Apple appears to be slowing down old iPhones that have low-capacity batteries. While many iPhone users have experienced perceived slowdowns due to iOS updates over the years, it appears that there’s now proof Apple is throttling processor speeds when a battery capacity deteriorates over time.


Geekbench developer John Poole has mapped out performance for the iPhone 6S and iPhone 7 over time, and has come to the conclusion that Apple’s iOS 10.2.1 and 11.2.0 updates introduce this throttling for different devices. iOS 10.2.1 is particularly relevant, as this update was designed to reduce random shutdown issues for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6S. Apple’s fix appears to be throttling the CPU to prevent the phone from randomly shutting down. Geekbench reports that iOS 11.2.0 introduces similar throttling for iPhone 7 units with older batteries.


Some Reddit users report that replacing their batteries has returned performance and CPU clock speeds back to normal. The reports are particularly troubling because any perceived slowdowns by iPhone users might tempt owners to upgrade their entire device instead of replace the battery. “This fix will also cause users to think, 'my phone is slow so I should replace it' not, 'my phone is slow so I should replace its battery,’” says Geekbench’s John Poole.


When reached for comment, Apple basically confirmed the findings to The Verge, but disputes the assumed intention:
Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices. Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components.
Last year we released a feature for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE to smooth out the instantaneous peaks only when needed to prevent the device from unexpectedly shutting down during these conditions. We’ve now extended that feature to iPhone 7 with iOS 11.2, and plan to add support for other products in the future.



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Old 21st December 2017
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If you read the source, they seem to agree with Apple's stated rationale. Apple's iOS slows down older devices because the older lithium-ion batteries on those devices are apparently causing problems if the processor operates at peak speeds. Not to force customers to buy new devices. (I wouldn't know anything about this. Never owned an Apple device in my current lifetime.)

However, it would have been real nice if Apple had communicated this clearly to customers without waiting for someone to stumble upon their secret. According to your source, okay?
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Old 22nd December 2017
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Originally Posted by coconutpalm View Post
If you read the source, they seem to agree with Apple's stated rationale. Apple's iOS slows down older devices because the older lithium-ion batteries on those devices are apparently causing problems if the processor operates at peak speeds.
Then they should probably have removable batteries


The battery is the only part of the phone that ages with time, it's possible they are using it as a countdown timer to deliberately slowdown the phone to entice users to buy a new one.
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Old 22nd December 2017
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Apple Being Sued for 'Purposefully Slowing Down Older iPhone Models'



Apple yesterday confirmed that it has implemented power management features in older iPhones to improve performance and prevent unexpected shutdowns as the battery in the devices starts to degrade, and this admission has now led to a class action lawsuit, which was first noticed by TMZ.

Los Angeles residents Stefan Bogdanovich and Dakota Speas, represented by Wilshire Law Firm, this morning filed a lawsuit with the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California accusing Apple of slowing down their older iPhone models when new models come out.

Defendant breached the implied contracts it made with Plaintiffs and Class Members by purposefully slowing down older iPhone models when new models come out and by failing to properly disclose that at the time of that the parties entered into an agreement.
According to the lawsuit, Bogdanovich and Speas have owned the iPhone 7 and several older iPhone models and have noticed that their "older iPhone models slows (sic) down when new models come out." The two say they did not consent to have Apple slow down their devices, nor were they able to "choose whether they preferred to have their iPhones slower than normal."

They're seeking both California and Nationwide class action certification, which would cover all persons residing in the United States who have owned iPhone models older than the iPhone 8.

Apple yesterday addressed speculation that it throttles the performance of older iPhones with degraded batteries, confirming that there are power management features in place to attempt to prolong the life of the iPhone and its battery. Apple implemented these features last year in iOS 10.2.1.

When an iPhone's battery health starts to decline, the battery is not capable of supplying enough power to the iPhone in times of peak processor usage, which can lead to shutdowns, Apple says.
"Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices. Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components.

Last year we released a feature for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE to smooth out the instantaneous peaks only when needed to prevent the device from unexpectedly shutting down during these conditions. We've now extended that feature to iPhone 7 with iOS 11.2, and plan to add support for other products in the future."
The lawsuit seemingly misrepresents Apple's original statement and suggests the plaintiffs and their lawyers do not understand Apple's explanation for how iPhone power management features work and why they were implemented, given the lawsuit's suggestion that it's tied to the release of new devices. As explained by Apple, when certain iPhone models hit a peak of processor power, a degraded battery is sometimes unable to provide enough juice, leading to a shutdown. Apple says it "smooths out" these peaks by limiting the power draw from the battery or by spreading power requests over several cycles.

Lithium-ion batteries degrade over time by nature, and this eventual wearing out addressed by the power management features is unrelated to the release of new iPhone models.

Apple does not deny that iPhones with older batteries can sometimes see slower performance, but power management is a feature that Apple says has been implemented to improve overall performance by preventing an iPhone from shutting down completely rather than a feature that's been implemented to force users to upgrade by deliberately slowing devices.

As many people have suggested, Apple has done a poor job of explaining why it has implemented these power management features and how the state of the battery ultimately affects iPhone performance. More transparent information about battery health should be provided, and customers should be better informed when their batteries start to degrade so they can choose whether or not to pay for a replacement. Apple may also need to relax its policies on when customers can pay for a battery replacement, as currently, a battery can't be replaced unless in-store equipment registers it as near failing.

An iPhone's battery is designed to retain 80 percent of its original capacity at 500 complete charge cycles. A defective battery that does not meet those parameters can be replaced for free for customers who have AppleCare+ or who have devices still under warranty.

For out of warranty customers, Apple offers a battery replacement service, which costs $79 plus $6.95 for shipping.

The lawsuit is demanding the replacement of the old iPhone and compensation for loss of use, loss of value, the purchase of new batteries, ascertainable losses in the form of the deprivation of the value of the iPhone, and overpayments because Plaintiffs and Class Members "did not receive what they paid for" when Apple interfered with the usage of their iPhones.


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Old 22nd December 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dukhiatma View Post
The tech giant has confirmed that updates in iOS intentionally reduce speed in older phones in order to preserve the life of batteries as they degrade.



Reddit users have noticed that Apple appears to be slowing down old iPhones that have low-capacity batteries. While many iPhone users have experienced perceived slowdowns due to iOS updates over the years, it appears that there’s now proof Apple is throttling processor speeds when a battery capacity deteriorates over time.


Geekbench developer John Poole has mapped out performance for the iPhone 6S and iPhone 7 over time, and has come to the conclusion that Apple’s iOS 10.2.1 and 11.2.0 updates introduce this throttling for different devices. iOS 10.2.1 is particularly relevant, as this update was designed to reduce random shutdown issues for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6S. Apple’s fix appears to be throttling the CPU to prevent the phone from randomly shutting down. Geekbench reports that iOS 11.2.0 introduces similar throttling for iPhone 7 units with older batteries.


Some Reddit users report that replacing their batteries has returned performance and CPU clock speeds back to normal. The reports are particularly troubling because any perceived slowdowns by iPhone users might tempt owners to upgrade their entire device instead of replace the battery. “This fix will also cause users to think, 'my phone is slow so I should replace it' not, 'my phone is slow so I should replace its battery,’” says Geekbench’s John Poole.


When reached for comment, Apple basically confirmed the findings to The Verge, but disputes the assumed intention:
Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices. Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components.
Last year we released a feature for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE to smooth out the instantaneous peaks only when needed to prevent the device from unexpectedly shutting down during these conditions. We’ve now extended that feature to iPhone 7 with iOS 11.2, and plan to add support for other products in the future.



Source

this is known sheet
so that appul gheyboys go buying for newer models
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Old 22nd December 2017
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Oh man, then what will I do with my iPhone 5. I think I have to sell it.

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it's not that simple, dookie dear ... manufacturers are making the devices thinner and smaller and lighter. having a removable battery doesn't aid in that goal.

apple has said that the slowing down is a power management feature. their explanation sounds reasonable enough.


consider this example. in windows xp, power management looked like this:




in windows 10, there are a lot more options available for power management:




apple's move towards making more power management options available for latter versions of iOS is not surprising, as you would surely agree?

the difference here is that in windows, it is a user-configurable option. in iOS, the user has no control over this. that's not surprising either. iOS and Android are primitive OSs with a limited feature set and limited configurability, as you would surely agree?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coconutpalm View Post
it's not that simple, dookie dear ... manufacturers are making the devices thinner and smaller and lighter. having a removable battery doesn't aid in that goal.

apple has said that the slowing down is a power management feature. their explanation sounds reasonable enough.


consider this example. in windows xp, power management looked like this:

< image >


in windows 10, there are a lot more options available for power management:

< image >


apple's move towards making more power management options available for later versions of iOS is not surprising, as you would surely agree?

the difference here is that in windows, it is a user-configurable option. in iOS, the user has no control over this. that's not surprising either. iOS and Android are primitive OSs with a limited feature set and limited configurability, as you would surely agree?
I agree with you, that why Microsoft stopped giving support for XP. Soon we will get more advanced batteries, i.e. paper battery and that will again change features as we saw during a move of smartphone industry from Nickel to Lithium.
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Old 23rd December 2017
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Old 23rd December 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coconutpalm View Post
it's not that simple, dookie dear ... manufacturers are making the devices thinner and smaller and lighter. having a removable battery doesn't aid in that goal.

apple has said that the slowing down is a power management feature. their explanation sounds reasonable enough.


consider this example. in windows xp, power management looked like this:

< image >


in windows 10, there are a lot more options available for power management:

< image >


apple's move towards making more power management options available for latter versions of iOS is not surprising, as you would surely agree?

the difference here is that in windows, it is a user-configurable option. in iOS, the user has no control over this. that's not surprising either. iOS and Android are primitive OSs with a limited feature set and limited configurability, as you would surely agree?
No


If the phone didn't slow down when the battery was dying, any user can figure out that the battery is at fault and get it replaced by apple. But actively slowing it down makes the user think that their phone just cannot handle the new iOS update, and so they go for a new phone.


Also, nobody really asked for thinner phones, and smaller batteries. They just need a new reason to sell the same phone every year with a new gimmick, also, lower manufacturing and material costs.



Keep in mind that this is apple's alleged reason for slowing down people's phones. It could be something more malicious. Maybe the battery isn't really dying, but they have a switch that checks the battery's manufacturing date, and slows down the phone if it is sufficiently old, so that they force the user to buy a new phone. Since iOS is closed source, we will never know. There is also a google search trend where there is a spike in the term "iphone slow" every time a new iPhone is released. Maybe apple is deliberately slowing down old phones.
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